Linda Nozick

Research & Faculty

Cornell Engineering’s leadership in research is evident through its current roster of world-class faculty and researchers, as well as its many centers and facilities.  

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Are you, or your company/business, foundation, or non-profit agency interested in exploring a project or research with the College of Engineering? The Office of Corporate and Foundation Relations can help bridge connections. Below is a link to a form that will assist our office in determining how to best serve your project or research goals and connect you to the right faculty and staff members to support your partnership objectives.

Research or Project Questions and Overview

More information about research and faculty

Did you know?

The Electric Wave Form Tracer was created by Harris J. Ryan, (Electrical Engineering, B.S., 1887). His new technology was applied to versatile monitors for modern cathode-ray oscilloscopes, television sets, radar and computers.

UltrOZ, a wearable therapeutic ultrasound system for horses, provides up to six hours of unsupervised ultrasound therapy to reduce inflammation and promote healing. The technology grew out of work done by Cornell alum, George K. Lewis, (BME, M.S. 2008, Ph.D., 2012) who co-founded the company.

George Winter's (Ph.D. Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1940) research led to the first publication in 1946 of the American Iron and Steel Institute Specification for the Design of Cold-Formed Steel Structural Members. Most of the research and the writing of this code can be attributed to George Winter. It soon became the world-recognized standard for this type of construction and has been published abroad in many languages.

Kate Gleason, who in 1884 was the first woman admitted to study engineering at Cornell, was in 1918, the first woman elected to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. She also designed low-cost housing in Rochester using a concrete-pouring process that she invented.

In 1962, Lester Ford and faculty member, Ray Fulkerson, published Flows in Networks, a groundbreaking treatise culminating a decade-long research initiative that developed the algorithmic foundations for analyzing the capacity of networks to supply services. These algorithmic insights continue to be the driver of methods in use today.