Linda Nozick

Research & Faculty

Cornell Engineering’s leadership in research is evident through its current roster of world-class faculty and researchers, as well as its many centers and facilities.  

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Are you, or your company/business, foundation, or non-profit agency interested in exploring a project or research with the College of Engineering? The Office of Corporate and Foundation Relations can help bridge connections. Below is a link to a form that will assist our office in determining how to best serve your project or research goals and connect you to the right faculty and staff members to support your partnership objectives.

Research or Project Questions and Overview

More information about research and faculty

Did you know?

In 2004, the first patients received the fully implantable artificial heart developed by David M. Lederman (Applied and Engineering Physics, B.S., 1966, M.S. 1967 Aerospace, Ph.D. 1973 Aerospace). At the time it was the most sophisticated device ever implanted in a human and paved the way for further development of completely self-contained artificial heart technology.

The name "Big Red Bear" originated in 1916, when the Cornell varsity football team collected $25 to buy a black bear cub, which they named Touchdown, to serve as a mascot. Cornell's varsity teams are actually nicknamed simply "the Big Red."

In 1971, Prof. Don Greenberg produced, an early sophisticated computer graphics movie, Cornell in Perspective, using the General Electric Visual Simulation Laboratory with the assistance of its director, Quill and Dagger classmate Rodney S. Rougelot. An internationally recognized pioneer in computer graphics, Greenberg has authored hundreds of articles and served as a teacher and mentor to many prominent computer graphic artists and animators, including 5 former students who have won Academy Awards.

Cornell was the first among all U.S. colleges and universities to allow undergraduates to borrow books from its libraries.

Prof. Jack Oliver's research provided convincing proof that Earth’s continents are constantly moving. In 1968, Dr. Oliver, colleague Dr. Bryan Isacks and a former graduate student Lynn Sykes, wrote the paper “Seismology and the New Global Tectonics,” that put together earthquake evidence from around the world that made a convincing case that continental drift was indeed occurring.