Linda Nozick

Research & Faculty

Cornell Engineering’s leadership in research is evident through its current roster of world-class faculty and researchers, as well as its many centers and facilities.  

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Are you, or your company/business, foundation, or non-profit agency interested in exploring a project or research with the College of Engineering? The Office of Corporate and Foundation Relations can help bridge connections. Below is a link to a form that will assist our office in determining how to best serve your project or research goals and connect you to the right faculty and staff members to support your partnership objectives.

Research or Project Questions and Overview

More information about research and faculty

Did you know?

Bill Nye “The Science Guy” (Mechanical Engineering, B.S., 1977) popularized science for children (and their parents) with a PBS kids show from 1993-1998. Still enjoying widespread popularity today, Nye remains a staunch advocate for science education and appears frequently on television and radio programs.

Pearl Gertrude Sheldon’s (A.B., 1908, M.A. 1909, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Ph.D., 1911) early research into shale fractures in the 1920s laid the groundwork for much of the North American shale gas exploration. Sheldon, a structural geology student spent several years afoot in the region around the Taughannock State Park and was a founding member of the Paleontological Research Institution in Ithaca.

David Duffield, (Electrical Engineering, B.S., 1962), the namesake for Duffield Hall, is the founder of two ultra-successful enterprise software companies: PeopleSoft and Workday. Dufffield’s foundation Maddie’s Fund has supported no-kill animal shelters, including Tompkins County SPCA.

Salpeter-Decay-The technique for detecting radiologic decay in tagged molecules called quantitative electron-microscopic autoradiography was developed by Miriam Salpeter during her postdoctoral research in Applied and Engineering Physics in 1961 to 1967.

Estevan Fuertes, former director and dean of civil engineering at Cornell in the late 1800's, brought the department’s equipment up to modern standard. In 1902, he became astronomy professor and supervised the construction of the A. C. Barnes Observatory. The Fuertes Observatory (completed in 1917) on North Campus is named in his honor.