Linda Nozick

Research & Faculty

Cornell Engineering’s leadership in research is evident through its current roster of world-class faculty and researchers, as well as its many centers and facilities.  

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Are you, or your company/business, foundation, or non-profit agency interested in exploring a project or research with the College of Engineering? The Office of Corporate and Foundation Relations can help bridge connections. Below is a link to a form that will assist our office in determining how to best serve your project or research goals and connect you to the right faculty and staff members to support your partnership objectives.

Research or Project Questions and Overview

More information about research and faculty

Did you know?

Edward Wyckoff, a Cornell Engineering student in 1889, drew plans for the first suspension bridge spanning Fall Creek gorge as a course project. He failed the project course, but came back tweny plus years later, and then Wyckoff, heir to the Remington typewriter fortune, financed the construction of his bridge over the gorge.

In 1903, Cornell electrical engineering students sent out some of the first radio signals of what would eventually become WHCU, one of the oldest radio stations in North America.

Sidney Kaufman (1930, AB; 1934, Ph.D.) collected the first off-shore seismic reflection profile and as chief of a water seismic crew that normally operated in bays, marshes, inlets and lagoons, Kaufman found a rock formation that extended from a bay near Corpus Christi into the Gulf. When his boss discovered what he was doing, he said "What the hell are you doing in 65 feet of water? You know we can't drill out there" and Kaufman returned to land. Decades later, the company put his findings to work in offshore production.His studies helped lead to petroleum production in the Gulf of Mexico. Kaufman later return to Cornell as a professor in geophysics.

In 2008, Todd E. Humphreys, Paul Kintner and Mark Psiaki, and Brent Ledvina, demonstrated the first known GPS spoofing attack, where a hacker can fool a targeted GPS receiver to misestimating its position, time or both. This has guided the development of a new generation of spoofing detection countermeasures to ensure the security of civilian GPS.

Prof. Jack Oliver's research provided convincing proof that Earth’s continents are constantly moving. In 1968, Dr. Oliver, colleague Dr. Bryan Isacks and a former graduate student Lynn Sykes, wrote the paper “Seismology and the New Global Tectonics,” that put together earthquake evidence from around the world that made a convincing case that continental drift was indeed occurring.