Admissions

Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been." Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo by breaking the rules to do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

Did you know?

The electric elevator was invented in 1891 by Frederick Bedell (Physics, Ph.D., 1892) while he was still a grad student. His invention was an improvement over the hydraulic elevators that couldn’t reach the upper floors of New York City’s rising skyline. Bedell was later appointed to the Cornell faculty as an instructor and in 1904 had risen to the rank of full professor.

Prof. David Erickson developed a solar powered medical testing kit so people in remote, underserved areas of the world can have fast, accurate tests for certain cancers. He also developed smartphone-based systems for measuring personalized cholesterol and vitamin D levels in resource-poor areas of the world.

William Durand, a mechanical engineering professor from 1891 to 1904, was instrumental in forming the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) in 1915, which was the forerunner of NASA. Durand helped to plan the committee’s first laboratory at Langley Field.

Professor Marjolein van der Meulen was co-Prinicipal Investigator on the CU-ADVANCE which started in 2009. Cornell University is committed to diversity and gender equity and to an institutional environment where all faculty can achieve their greatest potential in research, education, and service.

In the early 1980s, Prof. Stephen Pope published a landmark study of probability density function methods for tracking turbulent combustion. It was not until 25 years later that commercial technology caught up with Pope and industry began using what he had learned as the basis for their commercial codes.