Admissions

Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been." Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo by breaking the rules to do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

Did you know?

Estevan Fuertes, former director and dean of civil engineering at Cornell in the late 1800's, brought the department’s equipment up to modern standard. In 1902, he became astronomy professor and supervised the construction of the A. C. Barnes Observatory. The Fuertes Observatory (completed in 1917) on North Campus is named in his honor.

The electric elevator was invented in 1891 by Frederick Bedell (Physics, Ph.D., 1892) while he was still a grad student. His invention was an improvement over the hydraulic elevators that couldn’t reach the upper floors of New York City’s rising skyline. Bedell was later appointed to the Cornell faculty as an instructor and in 1904 had risen to the rank of full professor.

Prof. Jon Kleinberg developed the HITS (Hyperlink-Induced Topic Search) link analysis algorithm to rate Web pages. It was developed in the late 1990s and provided a way to rank search results based on relative importance rather than mere inclusion of a term.

Salpeter-Decay-The technique for detecting radiologic decay in tagged molecules called quantitative electron-microscopic autoradiography was developed by Miriam Salpeter during her postdoctoral research in Applied and Engineering Physics in 1961 to 1967.

John W. Wells (M.A., 1930, Ph.D., 1933), professor of geology from 1948-1973, discovered that corals can be used to determine past rotational speeds of the Earth and that the planet has been slowing down. His research spurred a remarkable increase in similar research studies and lead to discoveries in the changes of the orbital patterns of the Earth and moon over geologic time.