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Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been." Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo by breaking the rules to do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

In 1975, OR students Edward Ignall and Warren Walker along with co-authors publish their paradigm-shifting paper, “Improving the Deployment of New York City Fire Companies”. Later awarded the INFORMS Lanchester Prize, it sets a new scope of directions for applications of OR in the public sector.

In 2005, Prof. Larry Bonassar (BME)and Prof. Hod Lipson (MAE) developed the first bio-printing of living tissue and printed a meniscus which lived for three months in incubation. This launched the field of bio-printing.

In 1922 Laurens Hammond (Mechanical Engineering, 1916) invented the first system for watching movies in 3D.

In 1993, Prof. Darrell Schlom, his MSE undergraduate student were the first to suggest the stability of the HfO2/Si interface. This research enabled faster computing while helping the then-$300 billion a year semiconductor industry to keep growing.

In 1971, Prof. Don Greenberg produced, an early sophisticated computer graphics movie, Cornell in Perspective, using the General Electric Visual Simulation Laboratory with the assistance of its director, Quill and Dagger classmate Rodney S. Rougelot. An internationally recognized pioneer in computer graphics, Greenberg has authored hundreds of articles and served as a teacher and mentor to many prominent computer graphic artists and animators, including 5 former students who have won Academy Awards.