Admissions

Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been." Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo by breaking the rules to do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

Did you know?

In 2013, late Prof. Ephrahim Garcia , and his graduate student Michael W. Shafer (Mechanical Engineering, M.S., 2012; Ph.D., 2013) invented a “bird backpack” weighing less than 12 grams. The devices are self-powered and provide a way to collect data from migrating birds without having to recharge batteries or weigh the bird down.

Dr. Lev Zetlin was responsible for numerous inventions, including pre-stressed concrete for airport runways, and the space-frame roof, which uses light-gauge metal to form grand open-space enclosures with minimal interior supports (used for the first hangars housing jumbo jets). His most well known project is the World's Fair New York State Pavilion, called the Tent of Tomorrow, which still stands today.

In 1986, work of OR faculty Jim Renegar and Mike Todd helped break the rules in the conventional wisdom that the simplex method was the algorithm of choice to solve linear optimization problems; their work played a critical role in the development of a theory of interior-point methods for this application-rich problem domain.

S.C. Thomas Sze was one of the first Chinese students to graduate from Cornell in 1905 with a B.S. in mechanical engineering. He went on to become the driving force behind the building of China’s national railway system around 1909-1910.

Rick Johnson, Cornell professor of engineering, who holds a Ph.D. in engineering with a Ph.D. minor in art history, developed a process that can help verify paintings based on the weave pattern of the canvas. In 2013, his technique helped authenticate a long-lost Vincent van Gogh painting “Sunset at Montmajour.”