Admissions

Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been."—Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo and do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

Did you know?

In the late 1800s, Cornell Engineering awarded the nation’s first doctorates in Industrial Engineering and electrical engineering.

The Journal Physical Review, America’s first physics-only scientific journal, was founded at Cornell in 1893 by faculty member, Edward L. Nichols, (Physics, 1875). He edited it with the help of two of his colleagues, Ernest Merritt (Physics, M.S., 1886) and Frederick Bedell (Physics, Ph.D., 1892). The journal is still thriving today.

The name "Big Red Bear" originated in 1916, when the Cornell varsity football team collected $25 to buy a black bear cub, which they named Touchdown, to serve as a mascot. Cornell's varsity teams are actually nicknamed simply "the Big Red."

Estevan Fuertes, former director and dean of civil engineering at Cornell in the late 1800's, brought the department’s equipment up to modern standard. In 1902, he became astronomy professor and supervised the construction of the A. C. Barnes Observatory. The Fuertes Observatory (completed in 1917) on North Campus is named in his honor.

In 1974, Prof. Jack Blakely and his MSE students were first in the world to synthesize a single layer of graphene (a very thin, nearly transparent sheet, one atom thick) and determine its structure. Their method is the same used today by industries to make meter-sized sheets of graphene.