Admissions

Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been."—Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo by breaking the rules to do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

Did you know?

The Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico was designed by Engineering faculty member William E. Gordon. Built beginning in 1960, the observatory is the largest single-dish radar-radio telescope in the world and is home to numerous innovations including the discovery of the first exoplanets, creating a detailed map of the distribution of galaxies in the universe and mapping the surface of Venus.

Cornell is the only Ivy League/Ancient Eight university that also is its state's federal land-grant institution

NYC’s Grand Central Terminal was conceived and designed in 1902 by William Wilgus, who completed correspondence courses from Cornell Engineering in 1883-1885. He coined the term "taking wealth from the air" from his idea to lease the area above the Park Avenue Tunnel in order to help finance the station.

Research by Frederick Bedell professor of applied electricity at Cornell from 1893-1952 led the first commercially produced oscilloscopes. He patented improvements including ability to stabilize the figures on the screen and show several curves simultaneously.

John Sweet, one of the first professors to ever teach engineering courses at Cornell, in 1873 built the first micrometer caliper for making tools in the United States. He also invented a nail-making machine that made the hand production of nails obsolete.