Admissions

Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been." Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo by breaking the rules to do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

Did you know?

Richard W. Newman, (Mechanical Engineering, B.S., 1968) developed the first video endoscope. After a 40-year career designing medical diagnostic devices for Welch Allyn, Inc. Newman made significant contributions to the fields of flexible video endoscopy, glaucoma, and Alzheimer's disease.

In 1974, Prof. Jack Blakely and his MSE students were first in the world to synthesize a single layer of graphene (a very thin, nearly transparent sheet, one atom thick) and determine its structure. Their method is the same used today by industries to make meter-sized sheets of graphene.

Research by Frederick Bedell professor of applied electricity at Cornell from 1893-1952 led the first commercially produced oscilloscopes. He patented improvements including ability to stabilize the figures on the screen and show several curves simultaneously.

Nora Stanton Blatch Barney graduated with a degree in Civil Engineering in 1905 as the first women to do so from any U.S. engineering school. The daughter and granddaughter of suffragists, her groundbreaking career included working for the NY Public Service Commission as an assistant engineer (1912-1913), and later for the Public Works Administration in CT and RI as architect, engineering inspector and structural-steel designer.

HC Torng (M.S. 1958, PhD. 1960) owns a patent for one of the key technologies which formed the foundation for many modern high-performance processors. The patent was first granted in 1989 to Cornell Research Foundation, covering a technique invented by HC Torng which enables microprocessors to increase processing speed by determining which instructions are not dependent on the results of others. This then allows the processor to execute those out of order, and more instructions to be executed during the same computer clock cycle.